Filipino scientist known for work on coral conservation dies, 81

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, December 3) — National scientist Edgardo Gomez, who was known for his work on coral conservation, died Sunday, the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) confirmed. He was 81. “Through his pioneering research, he was able to steer the world’s first national-scale assessment of damage to coral reefs that led to the widespread concern over the status of coral reefs. This resulted to the worldwide conservation initiatives, such as the Global Reefs and Risk Analysis, Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network, and the International Coral Reef Action,”…

What a greedy, slimeball firm like McKinsey & Co. tells us about ‘the cancel culture’

Nonetheless, the various scandals swirling around McKinsey have largely registered under the radar screen before last week, when journalists from ProPublica, publishing in the Times, exposed McKinsey’s work on behalf of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. Two important things to note: a) it was the administration of Barack Obama that hired McKinsey for this task in 2015 and b) ICE officials under the Trump administration, justifiably pilloried for their cruel treatment of migrants, actually thought some of McKinsey’s ideas were inhumane. Source link

National Scientist Edgardo D. Gomez passes away at 81

NS Gomez was a known researcher, scientist, conservation advocate, and mentor in invertebrate biology and ecology, giant clam culture and restoration, and coral reef assessment and conservation. (Supplied photo) National Scientist Edgardo D. Gomez, an authority in the field of marine science, has passed away on December 1, 2019 atthe age of 81. NS Gomez was a known researcher, scientist, conservation advocate, and mentor in invertebrate biology and ecology, giant clam culture and restoration, and coral reef assessment and conservation. He was also recognized for his outstanding contributions and researches…

Report Highlights Beijing’s Ambitions in the Indo-Pacific

A recent Australian report has cast a spotlight on the Chinese regime’s intention to rival other major powers including the United States, Australia, and Japan in the Indo-Pacific region. The report, titled “Ocean horizons: Strengthening maritime security in Indo-Pacific island states,” was published by Canberra-based think tank Australian Strategic Policy Institute on Dec. 5. Chinese influence and investment in the region, some of which is carried out through its foreign policy initiative known was “One Belt One Road” (OBOR, also known as “Belt and Road,” BRI), can have “financial, strategic,…

Maurice Pink, Royal Marine bandsman and one of the last men to survive the sinking of the battleship Repulse – obituary

Maurice Pink, who has died aged 97, was a bandsman in the Royal Marines and one of the last survivors of the sinking of the battleship Repulse, an event which shook the British Empire. Royal Marines bandsmen were particularly adept at working the complex analogue computers which were used to turn visual and radar reports of targets into firing solutions, ranges and elevations for heavy naval guns. For protection, the fire control computer was situated at a transmitting station in the bowels of the ship, and there Pink found himself…

America’s influence, once so dominant, waning under Trump

It’s whispered in NATO meeting rooms and celebrated in China’s halls of power. It’s lamented in the capital cities of key U.S. allies and welcomed in the Kremlin. Three years into Donald Trump’s presidency, America’s global influence is waning. In interviews with The Associated Press, diplomats, foreign officials and scholars from numerous countries describe a changing world order in which the United States has less of a central role. And in many ways, that’s just fine with the White House. Trump campaigned on an ”America First” foreign policy and says…

ASEAN’s quiet resilience | East Asia Forum

Author: Kishore Mahbubani, NUS ASEAN should have begun to crack and fall apart from the strain of the rising geopolitical rivalries in Asia between the United States and China, if what critics say about its fragility were true. But ASEAN steadily marched through another difficult and challenging year and quietly delivered many positive results that will improve the wellbeing of its 650 million people. Most importantly, there were no wars or conflicts. Indeed, not even serious political tensions. ASEAN did not experience any aerial battles like the ones between India…

Will the Chinese Century End Quicker Than It Began?

Reflecting on the future of the global order, the late Singaporean prime minister Lee Kuan Yew warned that the rise of China is so consequential that it won’t only require tactical adjustment by its neighbors, but instead an overhaul in the global security architecture. As the former Asian leader bluntly put it, though “[t]he Chinese will [initially] want to share this century as co-equals with the U.S.” they ultimately have the “intention to be the greatest power in the world” eventually. Not long after the demise of the Singaporean leader,…

Former Chinese officials warn tensions with US raise risk of ‘accidental conflict’

The risk of an “accidental conflict” between the US and China has risen as a result of the heightened tensions between the two sides, a number of current and former officials have warned. While they said it was difficult to imagine a full-scale conflict breaking out, they warned that the current strategic, technological and ideological stand-offs between the two sides would inevitably damage relations even if they are able to reach a trade deal. Their warnings echoed recent comments by former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger, who told a…