US expelled two Chinese diplomats on spying claims: Report

WASHINGTON: The United States quietly expelled two Chinese embassy officials in September after they drove onto a sensitive military base in Virginia, The New York Times reported on Sunday (Dec 15). The newspaper, which cited multiple people with knowledge of the episode, said it appeared to be the first time in more than 30 years that the US has expelled Chinese diplomats on suspicion of espionage. Advertisement Advertisement At least one of the diplomats was believed to be an intelligence officer operating under cover, the Times said. The incident comes as…

Asia Times | China bolsters recon muscle in South China Sea

China is boosting its early warning and reconaissance abilities in the South China Sea, after US warships and aircraft have deliberately trespassed into Chinese territorial waters and airspace. A naval aviation division of the People’s Liberation Army Southern Theater Command recently wrapped up a long-duration AEW (Airborne Early Warning) training program which concluded in November, in which participating troops intercepted more than 10 kinds of simulated hostile anti-air radar signals and tested multiple tactics, the PLA Daily reported on Sunday. Compared with the same training exercise that took place in 2018,…

South China Sea news: Japan enrages China by buying £113million island for military base | World | News

In a move which is certain to enrage Beijing, the Japanese Government is spending £113million (16 billion yen) on Mageshima island in the East China Sea. The move echoes China’s increasing militarisation of the South China Sea, where it has fortified a large number of similarly uninhabited islands. It’s important to secure the site for field carrier landing practice from the viewpoint of security Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga explained: “It’s important to secure the site for field carrier landing practice from the viewpoint of security…

Is China Planning To Incite A “People’s War” To Dominate The South China Sea?

Key point: People’s war could start to look awfully like conventional marine combat if Beijing believes the military balance and the trendlines favor China. Last year China’s defense minister, General Chang Wanquan, implored the nation to ready itself for a “people’s war at sea.” The purpose of such a campaign? To “safeguard sovereignty” after an adverse ruling from the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea. The tribunal upheld the plain meaning of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), ruling that Beijing’s claims to “indisputable sovereignty” spanning some 80-90 percent of the South China Sea…

Post-war restriction a challenge for Japan | New Straits Times

KUALA LUMPUR: After six decades, Japan is still negotiating restrictions placed on its defence policy following the end of World War II. This has put pressure on the ‘land of the rising sun’ to substantially preserve and defend its sovereignty and territorial claims on a limited basis. It has also stiffled the first-world nation from asserting its force in the Asia-Pacific region, which is facing turbulent challenges, with such inhibitions not discussed openly in international forums. Japan’s former defence minister Professor Satoshi Morimoto said that for these reasons its armed…

Whole of S’pore raining since Sunday (Dec. 15) morning, temperature drops to 24°C – Mothership.SG – News from Singapore, Asia and around the world

It has been pouring in Singapore for the past few days since Friday (Dec. 13). So humid and cool the weather has been that people have been seen gathering at 24-hour laundromats to use the dryers for their washed clothes. The rain hasn’t let up as recently as on Sunday (Dec. 15) either, as the entire island has been experiencing intermittent showers since morning. According to AccuWeather, the lowest temperature recorded today was 24°C. More rain to come The rain is to be expected to last through the rest of December,…

Protests could spark stronger U.S.-China deal

WASHINGTON – Six months of civil unrest in Hong Kong has, obviously, created a crisis for the Chinese government. Less obviously, it has created a real conundrum for the U.S. government. At the end of November, in an overwhelming election victory for the opposition, nearly 90 percent of district council seats went to resistance candidates. While that body has little real power, the symbolic value was significant. And on Dec. 9, an estimated 800,000 residents turned out to protest — reversing a gradual string of less-massive demonstrations since they began…