Malaysian PM Mahathir: China could use force in Hong Kong

Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad says he fears China will intervene with force if the protests that are causing turmoil in Hong Kong continue. He recently sat down with NHK’s Naoko Nishiumi to talk about the unrest, as well as the rumbling US-China trade dispute. Q: Massive anti-government protests have been rocking Hong Kong for more than two months. How do you see the situation there? A: I never thought that a country with two different systems can really work for any length of time. Sure enough, this has happened.…

Washington Post editorial: Stand with the people of Hong Kong

The following editorial appeared in The Washington Post: It’s not often that Congress is lobbied by tens of thousands of marchers in a foreign city who wave American flags and sing “The Star-Spangled Banner” while demanding action on a specific piece of legislation. But that’s pretty much what happened recently in Hong Kong, where a mass pro-democracy movement, after 13 consecutive weeks of demonstrations, has grown savvy about the challenge it faces in seeking concessions from the Communist regime in Beijing. Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, has belatedly withdrawn…

UPDATE 2-London Stock Exchange rejects Hong Kong’s $39 bln takeover offer

(Adds more detail) By Huw Jones LONDON, Sept 13 (Reuters) – London Stock Exchange has rejected Hong Kong Exchange’s $39 billion takeover offer, opting to stick with its planned purchase of data and analytics group Refinitiv. The LSE told HKEX in a letter that it had fundamental concerns about key aspects of the proposal and that HKEX’s relationship with the Hong Kong government would “complicate matters”. “Accordingly, the board unanimously rejects the conditional proposal and, given its fundamental flaws, sees no merit in further engagement,” the London bourse said in…

Avoid irresponsible remarks on Hong Kong, China warns UK MPs | Politics

China’s ambassador to the UK has accused British politicians of exhibiting a “colonial mindset” when they express support for demonstrators in Hong Kong or raise concerns about Huawei or freedom of navigation in the South China Sea. Liu Xiaoming said British MPs were free to express their opinion about the Hong Kong crisis but needed to recognise there were limits. Critical comments were not a problem “as long as you do not interfere in Hong Kong’s affairs,” he said. At the same briefing, China’s military attache in the UK, Maj…