After South China Sea collision, Philippine protesters set Chinese flags aflame – Shanghaiist

Protesters in the Philippines have been burning Chinese flags recently in response to a collision in the contentious South China Sea. According to Philippines Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, on the night of June 9th, a Chinese fishing vessel crashed into a Filipino one near the Recto Bank, located about 150 kilometers from the Philippine island of Palawan. The crash caused the Philippine boat to sink and the Chinese vessel is accused of leaving 22 crewmen in the water to drown. Fortunately, they were rescued by a nearby Vietnamese boat. Philippine…

US quietly lowers threshold for conflict in the South China Sea

The US has been steadily ratcheting up the pressure on China’s sea forces in a way that could lower the threshold for conflict in the South China Sea, already a hotbed of tension and dispute. The US is signaling a tougher stance toward the Chinese maritime militia, a paramilitary sea force disguised as a fishing fleet and known to harass foreign rivals to enforce China’s vast sovereignty claims in the contested waterway. The Chinese maritime militia “thrives within the shadows of plausible deniability,” according to Andrew Erickson, a leading expert…

South China Sea: Furious Philippine protestors burn Chinese flags after fishing boat sunk | World | News

The number of flags represents the number of crew left abandoned by the other ship before being rescued by a Vietnamese vessel. Claimants encourage fishermen to fish in the disputed sea and the Chinese vessel is believed to be another fishing boat. As reported by the South China Morning Post, Mr Duterte dismissed the incident as “just a collision”. Manila has disputes with Beijing over parts of the region but has avoided pressing forward as to not jeopardise economic and diplomatic ties. Protestors in Rizal Park held placards reading “End…

Is China using its South China Sea strategy in the South Pacific?

ASPI’s three recent reports on the Pacific—by Richard Herr; Graeme Dobell; and John Lee—reflect the widening discussion in Australia of the region’s shifting dynamics. As Dobell put it, Canberra’s deep strategic denial instinct is roused. None of them, however, considers how Beijing might use its success in occupying the South China Sea as a template for expansion into the South Pacific. Although China’s growing presence in the South Pacific is multi-faceted and a natural reflection of its global power, Beijing’s efforts ‘left of launch’ could nonetheless erode allied access to…

Philippines Floats Dragging U.S. into South China Sea Feud

A spokesman for Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte suggested Monday that the country could invoke a mutual defense treaty with the United States to involve America in its ongoing dispute with China over a Philippine fishing vessel sunk in a “hit and run” accident in sovereign Philippine territory. A mutual defense treaty has bound America to the Philippines since 1951, requiring both parties to “act to meet the common dangers” in the event of “an armed attack in the Pacific Area.” Should the Philippines confirm that the ship sinking, which occurred…