Wake-up call to reflect, be united | New Straits Times

LETTERS The Movement Control Order (MCO) has forced us to retreat into our own homes where we are to remain until April 14. This is new territory for most of us, a disruption to work and the outings we have become used to. It’s a restriction to our freedom and the social preferences we pursue. The main objective of the current MCO is to prevent mass gatherings, to discourage movement and to enforce safe social distancing, which are aimed at flattening the infection curve and breaking the chain of further…

Sports has always been there for us as Americans in times of crisis, but not this time | Sports

Sports has always been there for Americans in times of crisis. During the Civil War, soldiers, both North and South, played baseball, which was quickly becoming the nation’s pastime. During both World War I and World War II baseball was there for us as well. The minor leagues were virtually shut down due to a lack of quality players, and many of the WW2 era baseball stars such as the great Ted Williams, volunteered for the military to fight for our country. Major League Baseball continued, even in a depleted…

Enforcement of arbitral award is PH core interest – The Manila Times

Second of four partsTHE ruling of the Hague arbitration tribunal vindicated the Philippines’ protests and swept away the apparent picture of China being in a position to control the South China Sea because of its military and economic power. The Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) with the United States is a component of the Philippines’ collective defense to have a pragmatic approach to the enforcement of the arbitration ruling. Nine-dash lineThe main threat to the Philippines’ security is the nine-dash line, which seeks to convert the South China Sea into a…

The Liberty Times Editorial: China is looking for a scapegoat

Nouriel Roubini, a New York University economics professor who is sometimes called “Dr Doom,” has accurately predicted several financial crises. In a Feb. 20 interview with Der Spiegel, he predicted that the COVID-19 epidemic would lead to a global economic disaster, that stock markets around the world would fall by 30 to 40 percent and that US President Donald Trump would fail in his re-election bid. Roubini also said that the Chinese government “will need a scapegoat” to deal with the impact of the epidemic, and that he assumes “that…

Australia should speak out on Chinese human rights abuses | The Canberra Times

news, latest-news, china, Australia-China Relations When it comes to accusations of human rights abuses, Chinese sensitivity towards Western criticisms is a cultural card Beijing does not tire of playing. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) bites back at the slightest supposed indiscretion by a foreign government, often threatening economic consequences in retaliation for a perceived insult. This deterrence tactic has had considerable success. However, China’s desire not to ‘lose face’ also presents opportunities. Late last month, Foreign Minister Marise Payne announced the appointment of board members for a new “National…

Media owners mold their journalists’ minds – The Manila Times

THE Philippine Star last March 5 ran a front-page story titled, “SWS: 62% of Pinoys believe AFP can’t defend WPS.” The Social Weather Stations (SWS) angrily wrote the newspaper’s editors, pointing out that this was the opposite of what its report said, that its survey found that “62 percent of adult Filipinos have much confidence in the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) in defending the territories of the Philippines in the West Philippine Sea (WPS).” The Star didn’t even apologize for its mistake, and simply ran a shorter piece…

Coronavirus solidifies US-China decoupling – Asia Times

In November 2019, Henry Kissinger was in Beijing for the Bloomberg Next Economy Forum, warning that the US and China are in the “foothills of a Cold War”, saying that conflict could be worse than World War I if left to run unconstrained. These comments came in the context of escalating tensions in recent years over trade, increasing rhetoric of military conflict over Taiwan and the South China, Sea, accusations of espionage and influence campaigns, and an all-out competition to define the norms and values underpinning the international order. One…

Taiwanese value their democracy – Taipei Times

A poll conducted by Focus Survey Research has found that 83.2 percent of Taiwanese see themselves as strictly Taiwanese, 6.7 percent see themselves as both Taiwanese and Chinese, and 5.3 percent identify as only Chinese. The remainder had no opinion or declined to respond. These figures provide powerful insights into Taiwan’s present-day democracy and the imagined community that it signifies. In 1991, when the yearly poll was first conducted, only 13.6 percent identified as strictly Taiwanese — there has been a nearly 70 percentage point increase in less than 30…